“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

23rd May 2014

Photo with 359 notes

Inheriting Mitochondria: Where does your father’s go?

It’s common knowledge that all organisms inherit their mitochondria — the cell’s “power plants” — from their mothers. But what happens to all the father’s mitochondria? Surprisingly, how — and why — paternal mitochondria are prevented from getting passed on to their offspring after fertilization is still shrouded in mystery; the only thing that’s certain is that there must be a compelling reason, seeing as this phenomenon has been conserved throughout evolution.
Dr. Eli Arama and a team in the Weizmann Institute’s Molecular Genetics Department  found that as soon as the sperm enters the egg, special cellular vesicles — already present in the fruit fly egg — immediately attract to the sperm like a magnet. They then proceed to disintegrate the sperm’s outer membrane and separate the mitochondria from the tail section, which is subsequently cut into smaller pieces that are then “devoured” by conventional selective autophagy.
Yoav Politi, Liron Gal, Yossi Kalifa, Liat Ravid, Zvulun Elazar, Eli Arama. Paternal Mitochondrial Destruction after Fertilization Is Mediated by a Common Endocytic and Autophagic Pathway in Drosophila. Developmental Cell, 2014; 29 (3): 305 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2014.04.005

Inheriting Mitochondria: Where does your father’s go?

It’s common knowledge that all organisms inherit their mitochondria — the cell’s “power plants” — from their mothers. But what happens to all the father’s mitochondria? Surprisingly, how — and why — paternal mitochondria are prevented from getting passed on to their offspring after fertilization is still shrouded in mystery; the only thing that’s certain is that there must be a compelling reason, seeing as this phenomenon has been conserved throughout evolution.

Dr. Eli Arama and a team in the Weizmann Institute’s Molecular Genetics Department  found that as soon as the sperm enters the egg, special cellular vesicles — already present in the fruit fly egg — immediately attract to the sperm like a magnet. They then proceed to disintegrate the sperm’s outer membrane and separate the mitochondria from the tail section, which is subsequently cut into smaller pieces that are then “devoured” by conventional selective autophagy.

Yoav Politi, Liron Gal, Yossi Kalifa, Liat Ravid, Zvulun Elazar, Eli Arama. Paternal Mitochondrial Destruction after Fertilization Is Mediated by a Common Endocytic and Autophagic Pathway in Drosophila. Developmental Cell, 2014; 29 (3): 305 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2014.04.005

Tagged: PaternalMitochondriaFruit flyDrosophilaSpermBiologyScience

()

  1. kevin00101 reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  2. allifindsthings reblogged this from vanesa
  3. vanesa reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  4. inthedrft reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  5. katydidkatydidnt reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  6. hipsterfont reblogged this from starsaremymuse
  7. wassim1 reblogged this from starsaremymuse
  8. introvertedhigh reblogged this from starsaremymuse
  9. starsaremymuse reblogged this from 3ducation
  10. awesome-chouette reblogged this from tinsnip
  11. mazarinedrake reblogged this from tinsnip
  12. tinsnip reblogged this from scientificillustration
  13. irregularflowers reblogged this from floresalbert
  14. floresalbert reblogged this from smoot
  15. terrajayde reblogged this from scientificillustration
  16. floculo-cerebeloso reblogged this from scientificillustration
  17. gremlyn08 reblogged this from scientificillustration
  18. mycahthelittlehobbit reblogged this from momoch0
  19. riotouspumpkineaterofflesh reblogged this from scientificillustration
  20. sonsofkuma reblogged this from scientificillustration
  21. humansexualityanddevelopment reblogged this from scientificillustration
  22. unicoronz reblogged this from scientificillustration
  23. snazzyapplecyanideseeds reblogged this from scientificillustration and added:
    Fascinating
  24. artofgetinspired reblogged this from scientificillustration and added:
    MEET THE SPERM
  25. kurtanrat reblogged this from scientificillustration
  26. appendixpete reblogged this from scientificillustration
  27. pumpkinlipz reblogged this from scientificillustration