“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

Promote Your Page Too

24th October 2013

Photo with 105 notes

Women’s Breast Tissue Ages Faster Than Rest of Body
A UCLA study has uncovered a biological clock embedded in our genomes that may shed light on why our bodies age and how we can slow the process. Published in the Oct. 21 edition of Genome Biology, the findings could offer valuable insights into cancer and stem cell research.


"To fight aging, we first need an objective way of measuring it. Pinpointing a set of biomarkers that keeps time throughout the body has been a four-year challenge," explained Steve Horvath, a professor of human genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and of biostatistics at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. "My goal in inventing this clock is to help scientists improve their understanding of what speeds up and slows down the human aging process."

To create the clock, Horvath focused on methylation, a naturally occurring process that chemically alters DNA. Horvath sifted through 121 sets of data collected previously by researchers who had studied methylation in both healthy and cancerous human tissue.

Gleaning information from nearly 8,000 samples of 51 types of tissue and cells taken from throughout the body, Horvath charted how age affects DNA methylation levels from pre-birth through 101 years. To create the clock, he zeroed in on 353 markers that change with age and are present throughout the body.

Horvath tested the clock’s effectiveness by comparing a tissue’s biological age to its chronological age. When the clock repeatedly proved accurate, he was thrilled — and a little stunned.
Caption: A newly discovered biological clock measures aging throughout the body. Credit: UCLA/Horvath lab
Steve Horvath. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types. Genome Biology, 2013; 14 (10): R115 DOI: 10.1186/gb-2013-14-10-r115

Women’s Breast Tissue Ages Faster Than Rest of Body

A UCLA study has uncovered a biological clock embedded in our genomes that may shed light on why our bodies age and how we can slow the process. Published in the Oct. 21 edition of Genome Biology, the findings could offer valuable insights into cancer and stem cell research.

"To fight aging, we first need an objective way of measuring it. Pinpointing a set of biomarkers that keeps time throughout the body has been a four-year challenge," explained Steve Horvath, a professor of human genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and of biostatistics at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. "My goal in inventing this clock is to help scientists improve their understanding of what speeds up and slows down the human aging process."

To create the clock, Horvath focused on methylation, a naturally occurring process that chemically alters DNA. Horvath sifted through 121 sets of data collected previously by researchers who had studied methylation in both healthy and cancerous human tissue.

Gleaning information from nearly 8,000 samples of 51 types of tissue and cells taken from throughout the body, Horvath charted how age affects DNA methylation levels from pre-birth through 101 years. To create the clock, he zeroed in on 353 markers that change with age and are present throughout the body.

Horvath tested the clock’s effectiveness by comparing a tissue’s biological age to its chronological age. When the clock repeatedly proved accurate, he was thrilled — and a little stunned.

Caption: A newly discovered biological clock measures aging throughout the body. Credit: UCLA/Horvath lab

Steve Horvath. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types. Genome Biology, 2013; 14 (10): R115 DOI: 10.1186/gb-2013-14-10-r115

Tagged: CellAgingMethylationHumantissuesBiologyScience

()

  1. bs-ba-ma-phd reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  2. carefulcake reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  3. uwcdoverbiosoc reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  4. ompfafa reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  5. miss--information reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  6. smiledontkillanyone reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  7. adventures-in-saint-petersburg reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  8. lovesmithworld reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  9. antimatteriscool reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  10. originalgrich reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  11. waepenlesbian reblogged this from badassbaeddellass
  12. badassbaeddellass reblogged this from benedictedatrocities
  13. benedictedatrocities reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  14. luthienlefay reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  15. iamvictoriaanne reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  16. merdugno reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  17. iredwoody reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  18. bandit1a reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  19. alquer reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  20. vollblutvitae reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  21. cupatty reblogged this from currentsinbiology
  22. alwaysstayingme reblogged this from thephilosophersss
  23. thephilosophersss reblogged this from blainedevonsmythe