“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

6th August 2013

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Amoebae Have Amazingly Complicated Social Lives (Science Daily)
In 2011, D. discoideum enjoyed a brief spell in the media spotlight, billed as the world’s smallest farmer (Nature). Now a collaboration of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard University has taken a  look at one lineage, or clone, of a D. discoideum farmer.
This farmer carries not one but two strains of bacteria. One strain is the “seed corn” for a crop of edible bacteria, and the other strain is a weapon that produces defensive chemicals.
The edible bacteria, the scientists found, evolved from the toxic one. The two strains differ by many mutations but a single key mutation, which hit an important controller in the genome of the nonfood strain, alters expression of 10 percent of its genome. This alteration increases the expression of some genes and decreases the expression of others.
A mutation that affects this much of a genome could be lethal, but in this case it had the surprising effect of making the bacterium edible by changing its chemical profile.
The discovery is reported in the July 29 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
The fruiting bodies produced by the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum as part of its reproductive cycle are pictured.
 Picture: Owen Gilbert / PA

Amoebae Have Amazingly Complicated Social Lives (Science Daily)

In 2011, D. discoideum enjoyed a brief spell in the media spotlight, billed as the world’s smallest farmer (Nature). Now a collaboration of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard University has taken a  look at one lineage, or clone, of a D. discoideum farmer.

This farmer carries not one but two strains of bacteria. One strain is the “seed corn” for a crop of edible bacteria, and the other strain is a weapon that produces defensive chemicals.

The edible bacteria, the scientists found, evolved from the toxic one. The two strains differ by many mutations but a single key mutation, which hit an important controller in the genome of the nonfood strain, alters expression of 10 percent of its genome. This alteration increases the expression of some genes and decreases the expression of others.

A mutation that affects this much of a genome could be lethal, but in this case it had the surprising effect of making the bacterium edible by changing its chemical profile.

The discovery is reported in the July 29 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The fruiting bodies produced by the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum as part of its reproductive cycle are pictured.

Picture: Owen Gilbert / PA

Tagged: AmoebaSocialBiologyScience

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