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19th July 2013

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BPA + chlorine = bad news (EurekAlert)
BPA’s ubiquity in the environment led researchers to ask what it might be doing in publicly supplied drinking water, which is contaminated at its source by BPA-laden discarded plastic and later picks up more of the chemical when it passes through PVC plastic pipes. Most public water supplies are chlorinated to kill bacteria, and the BPA in the water also becomes chlorinated, acquiring one or more chlorine atoms from the water around it. The question was, how does this chlorinated BPA behave in the body?
The answer, generated from cell-culture experiments, was that it produced different but no less profound effects. “We found that when you modify the BPA it works just as dramatically but in different ways on the same systems,” said University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston professor Cheryl Watson, senior author of a paper on the study now online in Endocrine Disruptors.
Ovarian follicle - Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a fracture through a secondary follicle in the ovary. The oocyte (developing egg) is orange and its central nucleus is darker orange. Surrounding the oocyte is the zona pellucida (green) and a layer of follicular cells known as the corona radiata (purple). Magnification: x1350 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

BPA + chlorine = bad news (EurekAlert)

BPA’s ubiquity in the environment led researchers to ask what it might be doing in publicly supplied drinking water, which is contaminated at its source by BPA-laden discarded plastic and later picks up more of the chemical when it passes through PVC plastic pipes. Most public water supplies are chlorinated to kill bacteria, and the BPA in the water also becomes chlorinated, acquiring one or more chlorine atoms from the water around it. The question was, how does this chlorinated BPA behave in the body?

The answer, generated from cell-culture experiments, was that it produced different but no less profound effects. “We found that when you modify the BPA it works just as dramatically but in different ways on the same systems,” said University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston professor Cheryl Watson, senior author of a paper on the study now online in Endocrine Disruptors.

Ovarian follicle - Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a fracture through a secondary follicle in the ovary. The oocyte (developing egg) is orange and its central nucleus is darker orange. Surrounding the oocyte is the zona pellucida (green) and a layer of follicular cells known as the corona radiata (purple). Magnification: x1350 when printed at 10 centimetres wide.

Tagged: BPAEndocrineBiologyScience

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