“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

12th July 2013

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Lionfish Invasion
Last month, the first expedition to use a deep-diving submersible to study the Atlantic Ocean lionfish invasion found something very disturbing — at 300 feet deep, there were still significant populations of these predatory fish, and they were big.
Big fish in many species can reproduce much more efficiently than their younger, smaller counterparts, and lionfish are known to travel considerable distances and move to various depths. This raises significant new concerns in the effort to control this invasive species that is devastating native fish populations on the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean Sea.
More at Science Daily

Lionfish Invasion

Last month, the first expedition to use a deep-diving submersible to study the Atlantic Ocean lionfish invasion found something very disturbing — at 300 feet deep, there were still significant populations of these predatory fish, and they were big.

Big fish in many species can reproduce much more efficiently than their younger, smaller counterparts, and lionfish are known to travel considerable distances and move to various depths. This raises significant new concerns in the effort to control this invasive species that is devastating native fish populations on the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean Sea.

More at Science Daily

Tagged: Lionfishinvasive speciesBiologyScience

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  21. dwhostuck reblogged this from currentsinbiology and added:
    These fish are so venomous that they are lethal even after death.
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  28. transhumanisticpanspermia reblogged this from somuchscience and added:
    invasive and horribly, australia-ly poisonous kill them with fire
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