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7th July 2013

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Tiny tweezers allow precision control of enzymes (EurekAlert)
In new research, Hao Yan and his colleagues at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute describe a pair of tweezers shrunk down to an astonishingly tiny scale. When the jaws of these tools are in the open position, the distance between the two arms is about 16 nanometers—over 30,000 times smaller than a single grain of sand.
The group demonstrated that the nanotweezers, fabricated by means of the base-pairing properties of DNA, could be used to keep biological molecules spatially separated or to bring them together as chemical reactants, depending on the open or closed state of the tweezers.
Caption: The left panel shows tweezers in the open position, with the enzyme (green) on the upper arm and the co-factor (gold) on the lower arm. Supplying a complementary fuel strand causes the tweezers to close, producing the reaction of the enzyme-cofactor pair. (Right panel) while a set strand restores the tweezers to their open position.
Credit: The Biodesign Institute/Nature Communications

Tiny tweezers allow precision control of enzymes (EurekAlert)

In new research, Hao Yan and his colleagues at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute describe a pair of tweezers shrunk down to an astonishingly tiny scale. When the jaws of these tools are in the open position, the distance between the two arms is about 16 nanometers—over 30,000 times smaller than a single grain of sand.

The group demonstrated that the nanotweezers, fabricated by means of the base-pairing properties of DNA, could be used to keep biological molecules spatially separated or to bring them together as chemical reactants, depending on the open or closed state of the tweezers.

Caption: The left panel shows tweezers in the open position, with the enzyme (green) on the upper arm and the co-factor (gold) on the lower arm. Supplying a complementary fuel strand causes the tweezers to close, producing the reaction of the enzyme-cofactor pair. (Right panel) while a set strand restores the tweezers to their open position.

Credit: The Biodesign Institute/Nature Communications

Tagged: TweezersDNAEnzymesCurrent BiologyBiologyScience

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  9. mikeographer reblogged this from currentsinbiology and added:
    Lol who’d have thought tweezers could get so small!
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  17. biobastard reblogged this from currentsinbiology and added:
    WHAT ARE YOU SAYING?
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  20. ferr0uswheel reblogged this from currentsinbiology and added:
    Are these tweezers organically synthesized in a lab? Or are they actually naturally occurring?
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