“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

26th June 2013

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Regenerative Electronic Biosensors
Imagine a swarm of tiny devices only a few hundred nanometers in size that can detect trace amounts of toxins in a water supply or the very earliest signs of cancer in the blood. Now imagine that these tiny sensors can reset themselves, allowing for repeated use over time inside a body of water – or a human body.

Improving nanodevice biosensors is the goal of Mark Reed, Harold Hodgkinson Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science. Reed and his colleagues have reported a recent breakthrough in designing electronic biosensors that can be regenerated and reused repeatedly.

Reed’s latest research, published in the journal ACS Nano, outlines a method to add a layer of molecules to the surface of the biosensor that can be chemically regenerated, allowing for reuse. The ability to recharge nanodevice biosensors makes them more useful for applications like the remote monitoring of toxins or biothreats.

Co-authors on the paper are Xuexin Duan, Nitin K. Rajan, David A. Routenberg and Jurriaan Huskens.
SciTechDaily

Regenerative Electronic Biosensors

Imagine a swarm of tiny devices only a few hundred nanometers in size that can detect trace amounts of toxins in a water supply or the very earliest signs of cancer in the blood. Now imagine that these tiny sensors can reset themselves, allowing for repeated use over time inside a body of water – or a human body.

Improving nanodevice biosensors is the goal of Mark Reed, Harold Hodgkinson Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science. Reed and his colleagues have reported a recent breakthrough in designing electronic biosensors that can be regenerated and reused repeatedly.

Reed’s latest research, published in the journal ACS Nano, outlines a method to add a layer of molecules to the surface of the biosensor that can be chemically regenerated, allowing for reuse. The ability to recharge nanodevice biosensors makes them more useful for applications like the remote monitoring of toxins or biothreats.

Co-authors on the paper are Xuexin Duan, Nitin K. Rajan, David A. Routenberg and Jurriaan Huskens.

SciTechDaily

Tagged: BiosensorsRegenerationBiologyTechnologyScience

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