“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

5th June 2013

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Researchers discover a new way fish camouflage themselves in the ocean
Fish can hide in the open ocean by manipulating how light reflects off their skin, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. The discovery could someday lead to the development of new camouflage materials for use in the ocean, and it overturns 40 years of conventional wisdom about fish camouflage. The researchers found that lookdown fish camouflage themselves through a complex manipulation of polarized light after it strikes the fishes’ skin. In laboratory studies, they showed that this kind of camouflage outperforms by up to 80 percent the “mirror” strategy that was previously thought to be state-of-the-art in fish camouflage.
The study was published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The research was funded by the U.S. Navy, which has an interest both in developing better ocean camouflage technologies and in being able to detect such strategies if developed by others
More at e! Science News
Image: Lookdown Fish, Jeff Kubina

Researchers discover a new way fish camouflage themselves in the ocean

Fish can hide in the open ocean by manipulating how light reflects off their skin, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. The discovery could someday lead to the development of new camouflage materials for use in the ocean, and it overturns 40 years of conventional wisdom about fish camouflage. The researchers found that lookdown fish camouflage themselves through a complex manipulation of polarized light after it strikes the fishes’ skin. In laboratory studies, they showed that this kind of camouflage outperforms by up to 80 percent the “mirror” strategy that was previously thought to be state-of-the-art in fish camouflage.

The study was published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The research was funded by the U.S. Navy, which has an interest both in developing better ocean camouflage technologies and in being able to detect such strategies if developed by others

More at e! Science News

Image: Lookdown Fish, Jeff Kubina

Tagged: Lookdown FishCamouflageOceancurrent biologyBiologyScience

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  1. nord-ouest reblogged this from tinsnip
  2. miniar reblogged this from elfkyn and added:
    predator is a fish?
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    I’ve spent many a night fishing for lookdowns under dock lights using small flies tied with white marabou and lead eyes....
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