“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan Current Biology

29th August 2014

Photo with 134 notes

Anatomical sleeping bag - Wear your insides on the outside and study human anatomy while you drift off to dreamland.  This creepy sleeping bag would be perfect for a Halloween sleepover.

Anatomical sleeping bag - Wear your insides on the outside and study human anatomy while you drift off to dreamland.  This creepy sleeping bag would be perfect for a Halloween sleepover.

Tagged: Anatomysleeping bag

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29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Science Junkie with 335 notes

science-junkie:

Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Thousands Of Its Own Expressed Genes
Virginia Tech professor and Fralin Life Institute affiliate Jim Westwood has made a discovery about plant-to-plant communication: enormous amounts of genetic messages in the form of mRNA transcripts are transmitted from the parasitic plant Cuscuta (known more commonly as dodder and strangleweed) to its hosts.
Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the tissues of the host and an attached parasite, the team found that the number of genes that gets passed into the host depends on the identity of the host.  The tomato plant received 347 of the strangleweed’s mRNAs, whereas the Arabidopsis received an astonishing 9514 mRNAs.  When Arabidopsis plant receives this many mRNAs, the total genetic material of tissues in contact with the strangleweed is about 45% from the parasite.
Read more

science-junkie:

Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Thousands Of Its Own Expressed Genes

Virginia Tech professor and Fralin Life Institute affiliate Jim Westwood has made a discovery about plant-to-plant communication: enormous amounts of genetic messages in the form of mRNA transcripts are transmitted from the parasitic plant Cuscuta (known more commonly as dodder and strangleweed) to its hosts.

Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the tissues of the host and an attached parasite, the team found that the number of genes that gets passed into the host depends on the identity of the host.  The tomato plant received 347 of the strangleweed’s mRNAs, whereas the Arabidopsis received an astonishing 9514 mRNAs.  When Arabidopsis plant receives this many mRNAs, the total genetic material of tissues in contact with the strangleweed is about 45% from the parasite.

Read more

Tagged: parasitestrangleweedgenesmRNAbiologyscience

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29th August 2014

Quote with 66 notes

To dwellers in a wood, almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature
— Thomas Hardy, Under the Greenwood Tree

Tagged: Thomas Hardytreesquote

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29th August 2014

Photo with 40 notes

Virga pilosa section
Viktor Sykora
Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
Technique:Darkfield (10x)

Virga pilosa section

Viktor Sykora

Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

Technique:Darkfield (10x)

Tagged: Virga pilosaPlantimagingbiologyscience

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29th August 2014

Photo with 84 notes

Study Says ZMapp Works Against Ebola (NY Times)

A new study provides strong evidence that the experimental drug given to two American aid workers stricken with Ebola in Africa really works and could make a difference in the current outbreak — if more of it could be produced.
In the study, all 18 monkeys exposed to a lethal dose of Ebola virus survived when given the drug, known as ZMapp, even when the treatment was started five days after infection, when the animals were already sick.

Study Says ZMapp Works Against Ebola (NY Times)

A new study provides strong evidence that the experimental drug given to two American aid workers stricken with Ebola in Africa really works and could make a difference in the current outbreak — if more of it could be produced.

In the study, all 18 monkeys exposed to a lethal dose of Ebola virus survived when given the drug, known as ZMapp, even when the treatment was started five days after infection, when the animals were already sick.

Tagged: ZMappEbolamonkeybiologyscience

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29th August 2014

Photo with 79 notes

Preventing cancer from forming ‘tentacles’ stops dangerous spread
A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) and the Lawson Health Research Institute (London, ON) has confirmed that “invadopodia" play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports, shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely.

To spread, or “metastasize,” cancer cells must enter the blood stream or lymph system, travel through its channels, and then exit to another area or organ in the body. This final exit is the least understood part of the metastatic process. Previous research has shown cancer cells are capable of producing “invadopodia,” a type of extension that cells use to probe and change their environment. However, their significance in the escape of cancer cells from the bloodstream has been unclear.

In the study, the scientists injected fluorescent cancer cells into the bloodstream of test models, and then captured the fate of these cells using high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Results confirmed the cancer cells formed invadopodia to reach out of the bloodstream and into the tissue of the surrounding organs – they essentially formed “tentacles” that enabled the tumor cell to enter the organ. However, through genetic modification or drug treatment, the scientists were able to block the factors needed for invadopodia to form. This effectively stopped all attempts for the cancer to spread.



"The spread of cancer works a lot like plane travel," says lead author Dr. Hon Leong, now a Scientist at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University. "Just as a person boards an airplane and travels to their destination, tumor cells enter the bloodstream and travel to distant organs like the liver, lungs, or brain. The hard part is getting past border control and airport security, or the vessels, when they arrive. We knew that cancer cells were somehow able to get past these barriers and spread into the organs. Now, for the first time, we know how."


Killer T cells attack a cancer cell. Notice the tentacles of the cancer cell.

Preventing cancer from forming ‘tentacles’ stops dangerous spread

A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) and the Lawson Health Research Institute (London, ON) has confirmed that “invadopodia" play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports, shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely.

To spread, or “metastasize,” cancer cells must enter the blood stream or lymph system, travel through its channels, and then exit to another area or organ in the body. This final exit is the least understood part of the metastatic process. Previous research has shown cancer cells are capable of producing “invadopodia,” a type of extension that cells use to probe and change their environment. However, their significance in the escape of cancer cells from the bloodstream has been unclear.

In the study, the scientists injected fluorescent cancer cells into the bloodstream of test models, and then captured the fate of these cells using high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Results confirmed the cancer cells formed invadopodia to reach out of the bloodstream and into the tissue of the surrounding organs – they essentially formed “tentacles” that enabled the tumor cell to enter the organ. However, through genetic modification or drug treatment, the scientists were able to block the factors needed for invadopodia to form. This effectively stopped all attempts for the cancer to spread.

"The spread of cancer works a lot like plane travel," says lead author Dr. Hon Leong, now a Scientist at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University. "Just as a person boards an airplane and travels to their destination, tumor cells enter the bloodstream and travel to distant organs like the liver, lungs, or brain. The hard part is getting past border control and airport security, or the vessels, when they arrive. We knew that cancer cells were somehow able to get past these barriers and spread into the organs. Now, for the first time, we know how."


Killer T cells attack a cancer cell. Notice the tentacles of the cancer cell.

Tagged: Cancertentaclesinvadopodiametastisisbiologyscience

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28th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Compound Interest with 165 notes

compoundchem:

Here’s another graph on insect stings I came across during research for tomorrow’s post. This one looks at how the painfulness of a bee sting varies by location. The author himself submitted to repeated stings in various locations to find out where they hurt the most. Now that’s dedication to research.
I feel that I should also point out that stinging locations included the penis shaft and scrotum. BECAUSE THE PUBLIC NEEDS TO KNOW.Source: http://www.joshuastevens.net/visualization/visual-guide-to-painful-insect-stings/

Ouch!
Be sure to check out the article. There are a lot more interesting graphs!

compoundchem:

Here’s another graph on insect stings I came across during research for tomorrow’s post. This one looks at how the painfulness of a bee sting varies by location. The author himself submitted to repeated stings in various locations to find out where they hurt the most. Now that’s dedication to research.

I feel that I should also point out that stinging locations included the penis shaft and scrotum. BECAUSE THE PUBLIC NEEDS TO KNOW.

Source: http://www.joshuastevens.net/visualization/visual-guide-to-painful-insect-stings/

Ouch!

Be sure to check out the article. There are a lot more interesting graphs!

Tagged: antswaspsbeesinsectstingsvenompainbiologyscience

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28th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Great British Bioscience with 827 notes

bbsrc:

Plants that fight cancer
This picture shows Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) alongside the structure of vinblastine, an alkaloid natural product.
This pretty plant makes hundreds of alkaloid natural products which are a rich resource for a wide range of applications, including the development of pharmaceuticals, insecticides and biomaterials.
Natural products from this plant have already given us some very important cancer-fighting medicines, for instance vinblastine is one of the compounds used in chemo-therapy.
Read more about BBSRC-funded scientists who are studying this plant and developing new industrial applications for the natural products.
Credit: Mr Andrew Davis

bbsrc:

Plants that fight cancer

This picture shows Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) alongside the structure of vinblastine, an alkaloid natural product.

This pretty plant makes hundreds of alkaloid natural products which are a rich resource for a wide range of applications, including the development of pharmaceuticals, insecticides and biomaterials.

Natural products from this plant have already given us some very important cancer-fighting medicines, for instance vinblastine is one of the compounds used in chemo-therapy.

Read more about BBSRC-funded scientists who are studying this plant and developing new industrial applications for the natural products.

Credit: Mr Andrew Davis

Tagged: plantscancerbiologyscience

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27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Fuck Yeah Needlework with 244 notes

fuckyeahneedlework:

idahay:

Finished this gift for my mom during my vacation. The golden thread was a real hassle! #holyuterus #uterus #uterusembroidery #embroidery #panties #embroideredpanties #embroideredunderwear #needlework #anatomy

That’s….amazing! (Gold thread can be a pain but the effect is very nice.)

fuckyeahneedlework:

idahay:

Finished this gift for my mom during my vacation. The golden thread was a real hassle! #holyuterus #uterus #uterusembroidery #embroidery #panties #embroideredpanties #embroideredunderwear #needlework #anatomy

That’s….amazing! (Gold thread can be a pain but the effect is very nice.)

Tagged: Needleworkembroideryanatomyartscience

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Source: idahay

26th August 2014

Photo with 92 notes

Weevil, with a extremely long snout
Zhang Chao
National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Beijing, China
Technique: Reflected Light  (4x)

Weevil, with a extremely long snout

Zhang Chao

National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Beijing, China

Technique: Reflected Light  (4x)

Tagged: weevilimagingbiologyscience

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